Police Management and Operations

ILJ staff (Connors, Webster and Spence) , with funding from the COPS Office, prepared a useful and timely guide for governments and communities that want to develop new police agencies (or merge existing agencies). This guide was based on surveys of several hundred communities that received "police start-up" grants from the COPS Office, interviews with over 50 law enforcement officials who had recently started new police agencies, and a focus group with experts who had participated in developing start-up police agencies. The guide includes useful strategies, policies, and tips.

Institute for Law and Justice and Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) (2005). See  Reports from the Field Web Site and Database.  ILJ worked with COPS to prepare more than 200 reports on community policing innovations across the nation.  They are searchable by state and keywords and available on the Reports from the Field web site, where police agencies may also enter information about new projects.  

McEwen, Tom, and D. Spence, R. Wolff, J. Wartell, and B. Webster (2003).  Call Management and Community Policing:  A Guide for Law Enforcement.  (Final Report, 255 pages). U. S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services.  This guidebook is based on a national survey, telephone interviews, and site visits, and highlights innovative police call management strategies that support community policing. 

McEwen, Tom (2003).  Evaluation of the Locally Initiated Partnership ProgramInstitute for Law and Justice.  This final research report to the National Institute of Justice discusses a cross-site analysis of 39 partnerships between police departments and research organizations.  

Institute for Law and Justice and Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (2003).  COPS Innovations, Promising Strategies from the Field:  Spotlight on Sheriffs.  U. S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services.  This publication features six sheriffs’ programs that made innovative use of COPS grant funding for community policing. 

Institute for Law and Justice and Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (2003).  COPS Innovations, Promising Strategies from the Field:  Community Policing in Smaller Jurisdictions.  U. S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services.  This publication describes 11 innovative community policing efforts supported by COPS funding. 

McEwen, Tom, C. Uchida, et. al. (2002).  An Evaluation of the COPS Office Methamphetamine Initiative.  U. S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services.  This is a comprehensive, final research report (255 pp.) on an evaluation of the COPS Methamphetamine Initiative’s six initial sites (Phoenix, Salt Lake City, Minneapolis, Little Rock, Dallas, and Oklahoma City).

McEwen, Tom, C. Uchida, et. al.  (2002).  COPS Innovations, Combating Methamphetamine Laboratories and Abuse:  Strategies for Success.  U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services.  This publication features results from a national evaluation of law enforcement strategies to combat methamphetamine in six jurisdictions. 

Connors, Edward F., B. Webster, et. al.  (2001).  Transforming the Law Enforcement Organization to Community Policing.  Institute for Law and Justice.  This monograph, prepared for the National Institute of Justice, is based on community policing case studies in Portland (OR), St. Petersburg (FL), San Diego (CA), and Tempe (AZ; a survey of police chiefs and sheriffs; and a literature review of organizational change in the private sector and in policing.

McEwen, Tom (1999).  NIJ’s Locally Initiated Research Partnerships in Policing–Factors That Add up to Success.  NIJ Journal.  U. S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, Issue No. 238, p. 2.  This article presents preliminary findings from a cross-site analysis of 39 police-researcher partnerships. 

McEwen, Tom (1996).  National Data Collection on Police Use of Force.  Institute for Law and Justice.  This report describes initial efforts of the Bureau of Justice Statistics and National Institute of Justice to collect data on police use of force, as mandated under the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994.

Institute for Law and Justice (1995).  Urban Street Gang Enforcement Operations Manual
U. S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance.  This manual for law enforcement addresses
gang suppression, interagency collaboration, application of special regulations and laws, and data collection and analysis. 

Johnson, Claire and B. Webster, E. F. Connors, and D. Saenz (1994).  Gang Enforcement Problems and Strategies:  National Survey Findings.  Journal of Gang ResearchChicago, IL:  National Gang Crime Research Center, Chicago State University, Vol. 3, No. 1.   This article discusses findings on combating gang crime based on a survey of 149 police departments and another survey of 118 prosecutors' offices. 

Homeland Security and Private Security

Operation Partnerships (2005).  This one-page description explains a current project for the U. S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, to develop updated guidelines on law enforcement-private security partnerships and invites such partnerships to provide information on their efforts. 

Institute for Law and Justice and Hallcrest Division of SAIC (2000).  Operation Cooperation:  Guidelines for Partnerships between Law Enforcement & Private Security Organizations.  U. S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance.  This publication includes case studies as well as guidelines for forming successful police-private security partnerships.  A related video is available from ILJ (contact ILJ).

Institute for Law and Justice and Hallcrest Division of SAIC (1999).  Operation Cooperation:  Partnership Profiles.  This report, prepared for the Operation Cooperation project supported by the Bureau of Justice Assistance, describes15 police-private security partnerships selected from among 80 such partnerships that were reviewed for this project.  

Institute for Law and Justice and Hallcrest Division of SAIC (1999).  Operation Cooperation:  A Literature Review of Cooperation and Partnerships Between Law Enforcement and Private Security Organizations.   

Technology Research

McEwen, Tom (2002).   Computer Aided Dispatch in Support of Community Policing.  Institute for Law and Justice.  This research report for the National Institute of Justice explores creative uses of CAD/RMS systems to further police agencies’ community policing objectives. See also, Executive Summary of the report.

Wartell, Julie and J. Thomas McEwen (2001).  Privacy in the Information Age:  A Guide for Sharing Crime Maps and Spatial Data.  U. S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice.  This publication addresses the problems of crime data sharing/mapping (particularly for the law enforcement manager) in the differing contexts of inter-agency cooperation, formal research, and public service.  

Computer Aided Dispatch Vendors on the Web.   This vendors' list, prepared in connection with research in 2002 on CAD and community policing, offers a starting place for exploring private sector CAD/RMS resources.  Please note disclaimer:  ILJ provides this list to law enforcement agencies purely as a service.  It is not warrant that any of these companies provide better products than other providers, nor is the list claimed to be complete.  This list was found using standard search engines.

McEwen, Tom, et al. (2001).  Case Studies on Acquisition of Information Technology for Law Enforcement.  Institute for Law and Justice   These 14 case study reports were prepared as part of a research project for the National Institute of Justice and address IT acquisition in the areas of CAD/ RMS, crime analysis and crime mapping, Intranet, criminal justice information systems, and wireless mobile data communications. 

Managing the Risks: A Guide for Improving RFP and Procurement Practices in Justice Technology Acquisitions.  Dussault, R., McEwen, T., Guynes, R., and Wartell, J.  This handbook intends to help law enforcement purchasers to effectively use RFPs and understand vendor expectations and right use of consultants for information technology systems.

S. McQuade and J. T. McEwen (1996).  Research Needs for Computer Crime.  Institute for Law and Justice.  This report summarizes results of an electronic conference that was sponsored by the National Institute of Justice and involved 86 experts in computer crime and criminal justice research.

McEwen, J. T. and R. Guynes (1992).  CJSSIM: Criminal Justice System Simulation ModelDeveloped by ILJ for the Bureau of Justice Assistance, this model—designed to simulate budget, time, and resource usage in a criminal justice system—is still of interest to researchers seeking to develop similar models in today’s IT environments.  Executable for Windows environment: Download.

Violent Crime

Groff, Elizabeth and Tom McEwen (2006).  Exploring the Spatial Configuration of Places Related to Homicide Events.  This research provides the first comprehensive exploration of the spatial etiology of homicide in Washington, D.C.  Three basic elements of convergence (victim home, offender home and homicide location) and three associated measures (i.e., the relative distances between each of those locations) are analyzed.  All six elements are explored both individually and jointly in order to increase our understanding of homicide.

Groff, Elizabeth and Tom McEwen (2006).  Visualization of Spatial Relationships in Mobility Research: A Primer.  Complementing the report on Spatial Configuration of homicide events, Groff and McEwen offer a primer on visualizing the spatial configurations of homicide.

Institute for Law and Justice (2005).  National Evaluation of the Legal Assistance for Victims Program.  This is a comprehensive final report to the National Institute of Justice and Office on Violence Against Women on an evaluation that involved a cross-site analysis of 20 projects and multiple methods to assess outcomes, including interviews with 125 victim of domestic violence.  An executive summary is also available.

Miller, Neal (2006). What Does Research and Evaluation Say About Domestic Violence Laws? - A Compendium of Justice System Laws and Related Research Assessments -- Draft.  In this document Mr. Miller begins to examine what the research literature suggests about legislation on domestic violence.

Miller, Neal (2004).  Domestic Violence:  A Review of State Legislation Defining Police and Prosecution Duties and Powers.  Working paper. 

Miller, Neal (2004).  Review of 2003 State Laws Relevant to Violence Against Women.  This is a working paper, not for quotation or citation. 

Institute for Law and Justice (2003).  Evaluation of Grants to Combat Violence Against Women on CampusThis comprehensive report to the National Institute of Justice explains the results of a process evaluation involving 38 campus programs designed to educate and influence behaviors, values, and attitudes concerning violence against women.

Institute for Law and Justice (2002).  National Evaluation of the Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies Program.  This final report to the National Institute of Justice provides a comprehensive discussion of a process evaluation involving 20 projects and an assessment of impact that employed multiple methodologies (data analysis, interviews and focus groups with victims). The Executive Summary is also available.  See also Case Studies conducted for the project.

Miller, Neal (2001).  Stalking Laws and Implementation Practices:  A National Review for Policymakers and Practitioners.  Institute for Law and Justice.  This report updates and synthesizes ILJ research on stalking supported by the National Institute of Justice and conducted in 1997 - 2001.

McEwen, Tom and C. DuPree (1998).  Training and Policy Development:  National Survey of STOP Grantees.  Institute for Law and Justice.  This report summarizes results of a survey of police and prosecutor efforts funded under the STOP (Services, Training, Officers, Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program to combat violent crimes against women and enhance victim services.

Miller, Neal (June 2004).  Domestic Violence: A Review of State Legislation Defining Police and Prosecution Duties and Powers.  This review can serve as a reference for state legislators concerned with domestic violence, including stalking, and a source of ideas for reforms directed at reducing domestic violence.

Prosecution, Courts, and Corrections

Guynes, Randall and R. Wolff (2004).  Un-served Arrest Warrants:  An Exploratory Study.  SAIC and Institute for Law and Justice.  This report for the National Institute of Justice examines the question of whether better service of warrants could prevent the incidence of violent crime.

Connors, Edward F. and T. Lundregan, N. Miller, and T. McEwen (1996).  Use of DNA Evidence, Convicted by Juries, Exonerated by Science: Case Studies in the Use of DNA Evidence to Establish Innocence After Trial.  Washington, D.C.:  U. S. Department of Justice, Office of the Attorney General.  This research report, commissioned by the National Institute of Justice, highlights the importance and utility of DNA evidence and discusses challenges to the justice and scientific communities seeking to advance the use of this forensic tool.

Miller, Neal, and T. McEwen (1996).  Prosecutor and Criminal Court Use of Juvenile Court Records: A National StudyInstitute for Law and Justice.  This report to the National Institute of Justice examines the relationship between juvenile and adult serious crime and practices for using juvenile records in adult court to distinguish between adult first offenders with or without juvenile criminal histories

Miller, Neal, and R. Gemignani (1994).  Juvenile Correctional Industries:  A Review of Federal and State Legislative IssuesInstitute for Law and Justice.  This report to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), U.S. Department of Justice, assesses the applicability of federal law regulating interstate transport of prison-made goods to juvenile correctional industries and includes information about new industries programs based on a survey conducted in 20 states.